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Thread: Batman need help

  1. #1

    Batman need help

    It has been a long time since I posted here and I have just been having many problems. I'm currently working on a Batman drawing. I am looking at it and just getting frustrated. I could use some advice or maybe if someone sees something is not right point it out. Thank you for any advice or suggestions.

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  2. #2
    Monkey with Crayons [Moderator] Veritas71's Avatar
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    A good way to spot problems is to flip the page over and hold it up to a light. Your mind gets used to seeing something one way, and you trick yourself into thinking it's perfect. Flipping it lets your brain see it all brand new, and glaring things will jump right out at you.

    I would also suggest doing more gesture drawings. Find your favorite artists and try to copy the dynamic poses that you wish you could draw. Stay away from surface details, it's stick figure time. Just jot down where the major joints are, and how the head, torso, and pelvis are turned and where they are in relation to each other. After a while, time yourself. Try to do it as quickly as you can. This will make you use quick lines to block in the pose.

    A strong foundation will pay dividends later when you render. Good luck!
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  3. #3
    We can only draw as well as we can at that particular moment. Accepting that is one of the hardest obstacles to clear.
    So try to relax, do your best and be thankful for challenges. They help us grow as artists and people.

    I think throwing in a bit more foreshortening will help out your Batman drawing.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Veritas71 View Post
    A good way to spot problems is to flip the page over and hold it up to a light. Your mind gets used to seeing something one way, and you trick yourself into thinking it's perfect. Flipping it lets your brain see it all brand new, and glaring things will jump right out at you.

    I would also suggest doing more gesture drawings. Find your favorite artists and try to copy the dynamic poses that you wish you could draw. Stay away from surface details, it's stick figure time. Just jot down where the major joints are, and how the head, torso, and pelvis are turned and where they are in relation to each other. After a while, time yourself. Try to do it as quickly as you can. This will make you use quick lines to block in the pose.

    A strong foundation will pay dividends later when you render. Good luck!
    That is great advice I will take a look at that. Thank you.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by nsterken View Post
    We can only draw as well as we can at that particular moment. Accepting that is one of the hardest obstacles to clear.
    So try to relax, do your best and be thankful for challenges. They help us grow as artists and people.

    I think throwing in a bit more foreshortening will help out your Batman drawing.
    Any place in particular you would recommend I foreshorten?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    More time on your under forms.

    Start with simple shapes and build up. Save details for last.

    You are your own best model. Neither camera or mirror required. Try putting your arm in Batman's position with your head stretched out. Note how you can't and trying is really uncomfortable if not painful. Drop the arm to where I have it. Note how you don't really feel anything. That's because it's a natural position.



    On a purely personal note: The villain makes the hero. The more normal the hero, the more impressive his actions.

    If Batman is 10x Banes size and beats him in a fight, Batman's just a bully and a coward for beating up on poor defenseless Bane. Booooo, Batman.

    If Bane is 10x Batman's size and Batman wins, now Batman's a hero and one scary dude.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty View Post
    More time on your under forms.

    Start with simple shapes and build up. Save details for last.

    You are your own best model. Neither camera or mirror required. Try putting your arm in Batman's position with your head stretched out. Note how you can't and trying is really uncomfortable if not painful. Drop the arm to where I have it. Note how you don't really feel anything. That's because it's a natural position.



    On a purely personal note: The villain makes the hero. The more normal the hero, the more impressive his actions.

    If Batman is 10x Banes size and beats him in a fight, Batman's just a bully and a coward for beating up on poor defenseless Bane. Booooo, Batman.

    If Bane is 10x Batman's size and Batman wins, now Batman's a hero and one scary dude.
    Thanks again for the great advice Smitty. I still am struggling in building on shapes. It's hard for me to break from what I have been taught in school, but I guess practice makes perfect and I would rather draw like a comic book artist then a fine artist.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N920A using Tapatalk

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