Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Eisner Tribute: Black Queen

  1. #1

    Eisner Tribute: Black Queen

    Hi guys.

    I've been working in this idea for the Eisner Tribute these last days but, as I'm not totally happy with it, I decided to show you and receive some C&C before continuing. The character is The Black Queen, a Catwoman-like thief. She has the ace of spades symbol on the back of her cape, that's why I put the card into the showcase.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by Almayer; 04-09-2017 at 03:21 PM.

  2. #2
    Oh, I forgot to put her right glove on... first thing to do...!

    Edit: Updated the image in the first post.
    Last edited by Almayer; 04-09-2017 at 03:21 PM.

  3. #3
    This is fine as a concept or thumb but is overly stiff and posed for an illustration. The two mains need to have the same casual grace as the guard (who's nicely done by the way).

    You are your own best model. Assume the position (her Majesty's) and then notice you're being spied upon... What does your body do? You and I may stiffen like corpses in rigor because we're not professional jewel thieves. The BQ is. This is not the first time she's been in this situation. Whatever is about to happen will be far closer to tonsil hockey and ball room dancing than fisticuffs. Think cool, casual, slinky.

    The Spirit isn't a catwalk model filled with pretend rage. The Spirit is an actual tough guy, arguably the toughest guy in comics history. He's a Golem. Shoot him, beat him, stab him, break his legs... he keeps coming. Consider who he's facing; Not an army of super-thugs but, a beautiful woman half his size. He's not pondering a punch-out, he's wondering how much kissy-face he'll have to put up with before he can cuff her. Me? I'd have him leaning in the doorway.

    Think flirt. "How to Drive a Man Simple" is page one of the Femme Fatale handbook (and a Spirit staple.) She'll get him just hot-and-bothered enough to drop his guard and then blow his brains out. He'll swap just enough spit that she'll forget who she's dealing with and make a bad move.

  4. #4
    Thanks Smitty. I think I understand. It is true she's in a typical concept art pose almost completely, and as I don't know much about The Spirit's personality (and about the character in every aspect) I failed to draw his silhouette with the right attitude (or at least a better one, appropriate to this situation). I'll change both main characters body language to tell the story better and maintain the guard. I'll try to keep "flirt" in mind for her pose.

    I'm worried about the background too, not only because of the perspective. I'm not sure but, even if it's covered in darkness something tells me is lacking of details to identify the place as a jewelry or museum. It's difficult to find references of a 1940's place of that kind and I'd like to give the drawing the right appeareance with few more hints.

  5. #5
    Love the girl/legs nonetheless!

  6. #6
    I like her legs too! I will save the girl drawing for other chance to use that position. I had in mind your feedback in the Wonder Woman thread when drawing her balanced (but this time was way easier as is a full figure). Thanks!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Almayer View Post
    I'm worried about the background too, not only because of the perspective. I'm not sure but, even if it's covered in darkness something tells me is lacking of details to identify the place as a jewelry or museum. It's difficult to find references of a 1940's place of that kind and I'd like to give the drawing the right appeareance with few more hints.
    Eisner was a cartoonist (emphasis toon) with hints of German expressionism. Strong silhouettes, sharp angles, minimalism. He wasn't above dropping a single item of interest into a spotlight with everything else in black. Especially on his slash pages where all sense of "reality" could disappear. Heavily influenced by what comes to be known as Noir, Noir gets much of it's look from it's makers being broke. When you have $10,000 and a weekend to pull off a movie, there's neither time or money to build sets or props. A sharp camera angle, weird shadow in the BG, a bead of sweat... Noir.

    Movies are an easy source for BG reference. 40s especially but all the way into the 60s. Noir is a natural genre as well as anything Hitchcock.

    For a jewelry store you'll need a display window. For a museum, beef up the doorway (massive wooden frames or marble columns) Throw a painting on the wall and some standing armor in the far corner. These can be barely indicated by rim lighting or each lit by their own spots. A more elaborate frame for the cabinet and a bit more jewelry in the case.

  8. #8
    I'll search some noir old comic book (I have none in paper). And try with the museum first (love the idea of the standing armor), and if I don't find the way to make the composition work I'll switch to a Jewelry. Everything with rim light, I don't want to loose the big shadows. Thank you very much!

  9. #9
    Straight Outta a Comic Book [SUPPORTER] Symson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    LA LA Land
    Posts
    2,575
    Blog Entries
    6
    Almayer, I suggest you go to the source. Check out film noir itself. There's plenty on the internet.
    Inviting 100 artists to celebrate Kirby and Eisner Centennial Tribute Books

    Joining you in the ABCs of faith - Action, Belief and Confidence

  10. #10
    Thanks Symson! Not much time to see a whole film, but just Googling "Noir Film" or "Femme Fatale" I'm getting some good ideas and inspiration to continue.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •