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Thread: How do I write a double page spread in a script?

  1. #1
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    How do I write a double page spread in a script?

    I hope you can all help me.

    I have a page 6 & 7 I want to be a huge exploding. I want to be able to show the house, the people, shrapnel, and the force of the explosion rip across the pages. Since the house if the focal point i want to show all of that in a double page spread. Since it is on page 6 and 7 this will be a surprise to the reader, thus a double page read would be an amazing artistic design.

    If I have not explained well below is a link of what i mean by double page spread.

    http://comicbookgraphicdesign.com/co...e-page-spread/

  2. #2
    Monkey with Crayons [Moderator] Veritas71's Avatar
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    You literally just wrote what the artist needs to know to draw those pages.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Veritas71 View Post
    You literally just wrote what the artist needs to know to draw those pages.
    Now I feel dumb for posting this question. I just wanted to make sure I was clear with the artist.

  4. #4
    Monkey with Crayons [Moderator] Veritas71's Avatar
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    Sometimes it is better to keep things vague, let the artist surprise you. Just make sure to include the important elements that drive the story forward.
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesdcreviston View Post
    Now I feel dumb for posting this question. I just wanted to make sure I was clear with the artist.
    “There are naive questions, tedious questions, ill-phrased questions, questions put after inadequate self-criticism. But every question is a cry to understand the world. There is no such thing as a dumb question.”

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  6. #6
    One thing ive been learning this time around here on PJ is the process of making comics is kind of like a collaborative version of the Telephone game, and everyone in the process adds abit of the puzzle.

    The writer, well they obviously write, but they need to be abit flexible with the artist. The artist is the one who knows what they are doing (hopefully) when it comes to not just telling but SHOWING the story. The different mediums have to be approached differently, so its important to know that the artist may change things up for a better and concise bit of storytelling that sells YOUR script. You tell the Artist what to draw, they draw their variation on it.

    Then, often the artist hands their stuff off to the inker, and again, the inker isn't just tracing the artist, the artist provides a suggestable template for what the inker needs to draw themselves. they not only provide texture, shadows, lineweights, but also are a kind of last ditch defense on fixing any small issues they may notice in the artists work.

    So yeah, what you got shoudl work!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Basilisk View Post
    One thing ive been learning this time around here on PJ is the process of making comics is kind of like a collaborative version of the Telephone game, and everyone in the process adds abit of the puzzle.

    The writer, well they obviously write, but they need to be abit flexible with the artist. The artist is the one who knows what they are doing (hopefully) when it comes to not just telling but SHOWING the story. The different mediums have to be approached differently, so its important to know that the artist may change things up for a better and concise bit of storytelling that sells YOUR script. You tell the Artist what to draw, they draw their variation on it.

    Then, often the artist hands their stuff off to the inker, and again, the inker isn't just tracing the artist, the artist provides a suggestable template for what the inker needs to draw themselves. they not only provide texture, shadows, lineweights, but also are a kind of last ditch defense on fixing any small issues they may notice in the artists work.

    So yeah, what you got shoudl work!
    Thats all I wanted was to be clear. I know that double page spreads are dying, but with such a dramatic change in the story I wanted that art shown in all its glory. Hence why i picked page 6 & 7 as well so that when the reader turns the page they are surprised.

    Thank you all for the feedback. Back to writing.

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