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Thread: Pilot Color Eno Mechanical Pencil review

  1. #1
    Ma-Ma's not the law... I'm the LAW! [SUPPORTER] 50%grey's Avatar
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    Pilot Color Eno Mechanical Pencil review

    Hey guys, I want to review this product since it has been such a game changer for me.

    I was having a lot of problems with smudging on my pages even with the glove so I moved to red and blue pencil lead.

    Problem was that is you could not erase, and the lead was very waxy, and brittle.
    I recently found this product on Jet Pens, and it has been the answer to all my problems

    Pilot Color Eno's are not only strong leads, but they also erase just like regular pencils. The bonus is they come in multiple colors so if you like layering this is a really nice way to do that.

    For some reason they also do not smudge at all. So your pages can be super clean when you go into the inks

    This is the link to the pack of 8 diffrent colors in 0.7 pencils.

    https://www.jetpens.com/Pilot-Color-...undle/pd/19233

    But they also sell just the leads on that site individually.

    https://www.jetpens.com/Pilot-Color-...t-Blue/pd/1476
    “Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” ― Andy Warhol

  2. #2
    Those look cool. I use colored pencils in my sketchbook when I want to add bone/muscle layers on my anatomy drawings. These are tempting

  3. #3
    Col-Erase brand colored pencils have always been ersasable (hence the name). They even come with erasers.

    While they have a true non-photo blue, the "light blue" has just enough red to make it easier to see while still remaining invisible to stat cameras. When scanning, use the scan softwares r-g-b filters. For archiving, scan with the red filter and the art will show as black. After inks, scan with blue filter and blue disappears.

    A glove is essentially made for smearing, it's no different than a rag, sock or Ronco™ Smear-O-Matic. It's what they do. The point of the glove is to protect the poor innocent page or cel from our diseased, grubby little hands swarming with icky art cooties (grease, oil, dirt, eek!) To prevent smearing, keep a sheet of paper between your hand and the page.

  4. #4
    Ma-Ma's not the law... I'm the LAW! [SUPPORTER] 50%grey's Avatar
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    Yeah, these are abit different in that they are leads for mechanical pencils. The colored mechanical lead you find at most art stores don't erase well.

    I never had any luck with the glove or the paper under your hand. It still leaves a light grey tone on the page for me.

    If I use a 4h its no problem tho.
    “Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” ― Andy Warhol

  5. #5

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    That's quite pricey but a better alternative to the colour leads that break under the slightest pressure. Then again it would be stronger at 0.7 size.

  6. #6
    that's cool, later on I will review your source URL.

  7. #7

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    I gave it to go to see how it felt. I bid and won a pink colour Eno for $7.50 AUD delivered. I've yet to erase with it and only tried it on moleskin. As far as coloured leads go I prefer the ones that go into the 2mm clutch pencils. Definitely influenced by my preference for a weightier drawing tool.

    I'll try it on illustration board and see how it fares. Don't get pink Eno leads as it's hard to see tonal values.


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