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Thread: Battle damaged Batman (LOOKING FOR CRITIQUE)

  1. #1
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    Battle damaged Batman (LOOKING FOR CRITIQUE)

    Hey there, Penciljack.

    So I started drawing this guy out of sheer boredom. Batman standing defiantly against some sort of nasty off-screen monster, the rest of the justice league in shambles behind him. Most of it is just posing at the moment, but I'd appreciate some honest criticism.


  2. #2
    The Gozerian MLaw's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing this. So, to start, the scene has some issues. It looks like a piece of concrete is ramming Batman in the jimmie.
    This and the general layout of the buildings makes me think you could use some practice working with perspective.
    There's issues with proportions all over but one big anatomy thing that sticks out is that the forearms and shins on Batman seem to have been hit by some sort of rubberizing weapon. Unless this legitimately is the actual thing being used in the story you need to straighten those bones back out a bit. This and a few indicators in the structure of the head make me feel like you could stand to study up on construction technique for building up your figures. This is the bread and butter for learning and I think if you were to look into George Bridgman's book(s) you would do yourself a world of good.
    Think of the skeleton underneath. Think of how the forms comprise the arms and legs and the "mechanisms" of those joints.

    Having said that, your linework is clean and your use of line weight makes me think you'll be a good draftsman once you get a handle on perspective and the anatomy work I mentioned. Thanks again for posting!
    Last edited by MLaw; 01-11-2017 at 12:41 PM.
    I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it. ~Pablo Picasso

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  3. #3
    As discussed earlier here, no power squatting outside the gym. When moving feet sideways, the wider the stance, the straighter the legs. For a crouch, get those knees together. You can move knees forward/back but, they'll follow twin arcs (blue) with a space between them best measured in inches not yards.



    You're thinking purely in terms of line. Think form, volume, mass. Study construction and anatomy. Build simple shapes first before bothering with "line"

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    Thank you both for your wonderful feedback! Mlaw, I definitely see what you mean about the forearm and the legs. I was going for some sort of 'exagerated perspective', but it didnt exactly work. I'll get to work on straightening up those bones.

    Not quite understanding the issue with the head, however. You also said there are anatomy issues outside of the limbs? Any chance you could elaborate? (If you have the time, of course).

    And Smitty, I definitely see what you mean. The pose looks pretty ridiculous from a front view. I'll avoid the 'power squat' in future pieces.

  5. #5
    The Gozerian MLaw's Avatar
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    Basically, you've done what most people starting out (and even those who've been at it a while) do. You've drawn in your head and perhaps indicated a few markers but basically all the features are being drawn on as surface details rather than being integral to the actual structure and shape of the head. The various bones, muscles, fatty tissues.. all of that wraps to and forms the contours of the head. Easiest example.. your nose. The nose is like a wedge that protrudes from sort of planar surface. Yours, which is drawn as a typical go-to nose looks flat and like it does not match to the form of the head to which it is attached. This is one example, the brows, cheek bones, muscles of the mouth.. all of it ties in together.



    Here's a simplified planar map of the head to help.



    This is the first video I found on the subject.. There are tons more.. just basically have a look at what's out there and what they have to say.

    Lastly.. this is an image from the Bridgman book I recommended earlier. It's loaded with these sorts of helpful drawings that show underlying foundation that can help add a sense of structure to your drawings.
    I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it. ~Pablo Picasso

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  6. #6
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    All of your muscles seem to be in the right place except for the shoulder. the shoulder should be less separate from the breasts.

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