Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567
Results 61 to 69 of 69

Thread: comics you would never buy...

  1. #61
    I never understood why I bought Youngblood or Shadow Hawk...so sad

  2. #62
    Not Spoiling for a Fight Pencilero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock.
    Posts
    6,759

    Lightbulb

    Currently - anything by Robert Kirkman or Matt Fraction. I've tried reading several of their works and none of them have impressed me.

    Kirkman is the very definition of a completely mediocre writer.

    Fraction's work reminds me of an off-brand Giffen & DeMatteis, with none of the quality of Giffen & DeMatteis. It's as if he wants to write the comedy duo style book, but doesn't comprehend the dynamics of the joker and the straight-man. So you end up with everybody being a snarky tool, and not at all entertaining.
    New and improved for 1996!
    Instagram: Pencilero

  3. #63
    Return If Possible [SUPPORTER]
    [Moderator]
    Popninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    13,848
    Quote Originally Posted by Pencilero View Post
    Currently - anything by Robert Kirkman or Matt Fraction. I've tried reading several of their works and none of them have impressed me.

    Kirkman is the very definition of a completely mediocre writer.

    Fraction's work reminds me of an off-brand Giffen & DeMatteis, with none of the quality of Giffen & DeMatteis. It's as if he wants to write the comedy duo style book, but doesn't comprehend the dynamics of the joker and the straight-man. So you end up with everybody being a snarky tool, and not at all entertaining.
    Agree about Fraction, but disagree about Kirkman. I felt he was mediocre when he was at Marvel, but his creator owned stuff is great, imho. Are you reading TWD or Outcast? I returned to TWD after a lengthy absence and was pleasantly surprised at how intensely good it still is. And I can't say enough great things about Outcast. But again, of course, just my opinion.
    Money can't buy you happiness, but it will pay for the search.

  4. #64
    Not Spoiling for a Fight Pencilero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock.
    Posts
    6,759
    Yeah, I tried several of Kirkman's creator owned books.

    Battle Pope = Alarmingly not funny, South Park inspired cash grab.
    Invincible = Savage Dragon Lite.
    Walking Dead = Checked out with Tony Moore - I'm an art first guy.

    Kirkman is basically the writing equivalent of the kid who grows up admiring Joe Mad, and builds his visual foundation on Joe Mad art.

    I'd say Jonathan Hickman is in the same boat, and a better comparison - because for my dollar Hickman has all the kooky ideas Grant Morrison used to have before he sucked up into his own navel and started tripping balls and telling encounters with spider-god stories.

    So yeah, I guess since nothing I've read from him strikes me as particularly remarkable Kirkman is the Roger Cruz of writing.
    New and improved for 1996!
    Instagram: Pencilero

  5. #65
    Return If Possible [SUPPORTER]
    [Moderator]
    Popninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Keene, NH
    Posts
    13,848
    Quote Originally Posted by Pencilero View Post
    Walking Dead = Checked out with Tony Moore - I'm an art first guy.
    Yeah, I get that, sorta. I felt the same way when Ottley took over for Cory Walker on Invincible, but now I can't imagine Invincible drawn by anyone else. It's that way with TWD now. BTW, if anyone is an art first guy, I'm that guy, and I'm telling you that Adlard is great on TWD.

    But as they say, tastes...
    Money can't buy you happiness, but it will pay for the search.

  6. #66
    Not Spoiling for a Fight Pencilero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock.
    Posts
    6,759
    Quote Originally Posted by Popninja View Post
    Yeah, I get that, sorta. I felt the same way when Ottley took over for Cory Walker on Invincible, but now I can't imagine Invincible drawn by anyone else. It's that way with TWD now. BTW, if anyone is an art first guy, I'm that guy, and I'm telling you that Adlard is great on TWD.

    But as they say, tastes...
    Yeah, you're not the first person to sing the praises of whoever is on the book now to me.

    Glad to see he's grown into it, because going from Tony Moore to whoever came after was full stop for me. No thanks.
    New and improved for 1996!
    Instagram: Pencilero

  7. #67
    Seeing as how this thread hasn't been going for two years, I'll go off a bit here...

    I think I have finally lost interest in anything from Marvel. Their annual rebooting/rebranding system may have totally lost me. I'm just not interested in what seems to be the pure superficiality of Marvel's fast food titles.

    Two nights ago I was reading the New Mutants Classics volume four (first Legion storyline) written by Claremont, art by Sienkiewicz. Now as far as I'm aware of, this isn't usually viewed as some of the best comic book writing of the 80s, but certainly pretty good for its time, and it's nothing like the Marvel standard of the last ten years. It's not overflowing with witty banter where every character is a comedian, and it's certainly not decompressed story. In fact, I've read entire comics in the amount of time it takes me to make it through one page of some of this... but it sort of hit me what we have lost from this era. The characters are very sincere, maybe even too transparent, but they have a grounded feel as they are working through inner personal issues with a dramatic sense of development that isn't just blown off with a couple of smug comments a few seconds before going into yet another battle. The point here being that despite being a bit cheesy, it does give a sense of an organic evolution within the characters and doesn't feel like a packaged idea with processed, by-the-numbers writing. When I read it, it feels like I'm investing into it, and in return I get a sense of real commitment from the writer. In short, it reads like something more than a script formula and a sales record.
    Last edited by Nexus; 07-18-2017 at 03:30 PM.

  8. #68
    Not Spoiling for a Fight Pencilero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock.
    Posts
    6,759
    That's a pretty good observation.

    Chris Claremont was a very highly regarded writer when I was younger, and he even penned a novel here and there.

    Modern comic writers tend to follow the Bendis school of Aaron Sorkin screenwriting.

    Another good example is comparing Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis humorous writing on Justice League International, versus - an example from a few years ago now - Defenders by Matt Fraction. Defenders reads very similarly to how you describe modern comics, everybody in a snarky one-note character. Meanwhile JLI has humorous characters and scenarious, but not every character is a joker; and there's balance and a fun story.
    New and improved for 1996!
    Instagram: Pencilero

  9. #69
    I haven't read Defenders, but it sounds like the typical scenario that destroys a story for me. If the primary concern is "the formula", and not the plot with appropriate characterization (which should change depending on the situation), then it's not really a story that is being written, it's a formula. And as soon as that becomes the obvious focus in the story, I'm usually done.

    I think knowing the three act play formula for a script writer is essential, but it shouldn't be used at the expense of long term characterization and plot development like it is right now in both comic books and screen writing. You can't just do the current standard of -Introduction, Comedy, Big Battle- over and over again and continue to hold interest in the long term, and Marvel is seeing the results of this fill-in-the-blanks approach as their comic book sales have plummeted. Give it time and we will see the same thing in movies. How many final big battles can we watch until it becomes meaningless? The end of Wonder Woman was the same as the end of Doctor Strange, which was the same as the end of Batman vs. Superman, which was the same as Fantastic Four... if you boil it right down. Long term character development and consequential gains and losses are the key to real story in my mind, because that's what makes it real. Rebooting, events, pc trends, and comedy routines are merely cheap fixes that are now showing to cause more problems than they solve because that's all just meaningless fluff.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •